New reports say the Pixel 6 will feature a custom Google “Whitechapel” SoC – Ars Technica7 min read

https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2021/04/new-reports-say-the-pixel-6-will-feature-a-custom-google-whitechapel-soc/

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Googles GPU and modem solutions will be an area of excellent interest. Samsung has an offer with AMD for its future GPUs, however I doubt that would be up for grabs in its Google collaboration. If this chip is truly Exynos-adjacent, Samsung and numerous other also-ran SoC suppliers go with off-the-shelf ARM Mali GPUs, which are usually not competitive with what Qualcomm puts out.
Thinking of Googles SoC having an onboard modem is an obstacle. You usually do not get to incorporate a modem into your SoC unless you own the modem style, and Google does not own any modem IP. Samsung has produced chips with onboard 5G modems, but they normally dont come to the United States, so a Samsung modem would require both sharing the style to Google and bringing it to the US for the first time. Qualcomm is, obviously, the king of strong-arming companies with its modem IP and keeping rivals out of the United States, and its likewise normally a leader in modem technologies like 5G. Apple has handled already with different cellular modems– today the iPhone 12 comes with a discreet Qualcomm modem for 5G, which is probably the most likely choice for Google. Apple likewise purchased Intels modem department for a billion dollars, indicating its working towards onboard modem tech.
In addition to the normal CPU/GPU/modem choices, Google might likewise consist of some camera and AI special sauce in the type of some type of co-processor (ideally well also get the Pixels first video camera sensor upgrade in 4 years). Google will also most likely include a Titan security chip. Even if it did, I cant imagine these making a substantial difference compared to something like shipping with a low-grade GPU or modem. Google has never demonstrated a strong end-user advantage from its custom silicon in the past, simply a lot of buzz.
Its tough to be bullish on Googles SoC future when the company doesnt appear to be making the big-money acquisitions and licensing offers that Apple, Qualcomm, and Samsung are making. However a minimum of its a start.

Whitechapel will provide Google more control over its smart device hardware, however Googles customized chips in the past have not exactly set the world on fire, and therefore its affordable to temper expectations for the businesss first-generation SoC.
Currently, Google is in the humiliating position of offering less support for its gadgets than Samsung, which is now up to three years of major updates (Qualcomms maximum) and 4 years of security updates, while Google only uses one year less of security updates. Possibly Google didnt right away match Samsung because its waiting for the Pixel 6 launch, where it will reveal drastically longer support timelines thanks to its own chip?
When even Qualcomm isnt presently shipping customized chips, I dont see any method Google utilizes anything over the off-the-shelf ARM CPU styles.
Samsung has actually produced chips with onboard 5G modems, but they generally dont come to the US, so a Samsung modem would need both sharing the style to Google and bringing it to the United States for the first time.

It seems like this custom Google SoC-powered Pixel is truly going to take place. Echoing reports from about a year back, 9to5Google is reporting that the Pixel 6 is expected to ship with Googles custom “Whitechapel” SoC rather of a Qualcomm Snapdragon chip.
The report says “Google refers to this chip as “GS101,” with “GS” possibly being brief for “Google Silicon.” It also keeps in mind that chip will be shared throughout the two Google phones that are currently in advancement, the Pixel 6 and something like a “Pixel 5a 5G.” 9to5 says it has viewed paperwork that indicates Samsungs SLSI division (Team Exynos) being involved, which lines up with the earlier report from Axios stating the chip is “designed in cooperation with Samsung” and must be constructed on Samsungs 5nm foundry lines. 9to5Google states the chip “will have some commonness with Samsung Exynos, including software parts.”
XDA Developers states it can substantiate the report, saying “According to our source, it appears the SoC will feature a 3 cluster setup with a TPU (Tensor Processing Unit). Google also refers to its next Pixel devices as dauntless-equipped phones, which we believe describes them having actually an integrated Titan M security chip (code-named “Citadel).” A “3 cluster setup” would be something like how the Snapdragon 888 works, which has 3 CPU core sizes: a single large ARM X1 core for huge single-threaded work, 3 medium Cortex A78 cores for multicore work, and four Cortex A55 cores for background work.
The Pixel 6 must be out sometime in Q4 2021, and Pixel phones always heavily, heavily leakage before they introduce. So Im sure well see more of this thing soon.
Affordable expectations from Whitechapel
The fact of the matter, though, is that Apple is a $2 trillion hardware business and the iPhone is its biggest product, while Google is a marketing company with a hardware division as a small side project. Whitechapel will give Google more control over its smartphone hardware, but Googles customized chips in the past have not precisely set the world on fire, and therefore its affordable to temper expectations for the businesss first-generation SoC.
Googles customer hardware team has actually already shipped several customized chips, and I do not understand if you might call any of them world-beaters:
The Pixel Visual Core in the Pixel 2 and 3 was a customized electronic camera co-processor developed with the assistance of Intel. The Visual Core aided with HDR+ processing, but Google had the ability to accomplish the very same image quality on the Pixel 3a, which didnt have the chip.
The Pixel Neural Core in the Pixel 4 was drawn out of the businesss Tensor Processing Unit (TPU) AI accelerator efforts and had a similar job doing electronic camera and AI voice acknowledgment work. It was unimportant adequate to just cut from the Pixel 5 completely.
There was the air-gesture detection chip, Project Soli, on the Pixel 4. This was a radar-on-a-chip idea that Google initially pitched as efficient in identifying “sub millimeter motions of your fingers,” but by the time it was commercialized, it might just discover big, arm-waving gestures. The feature still exists today in the brand-new Nest Hub, for sleep tracking, but it was unsatisfactory to make the dive to the Pixel 5.
The companys Titan M Security Chip works as the safe element in some Pixel phones. Google states this makes the Pixel phones more safe and secure, though an approximately comparable secure element also comes with a Qualcomm chip, or at least, the business has never ever demonstrated a concrete difference.

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With Qualcomm out of the method, there are no reasons for Google to not match Apples five-year iPhone upgrade policy. With a custom-made SoC, Google will absolutely control how long it can update devices.
Presently, Google is in the awkward position of providing less support for its gadgets than Samsung, which is now as much as three years of major updates (Qualcomms maximum) and four years of security updates, while Google only provides one year less of security updates. Its a strange position for Google to be in, which previously was leading the environment in hardware support. Possibly Google didnt immediately match Samsung because its waiting for the Pixel 6 launch, where it will reveal significantly longer support timelines thanks to its own chip?
Really completing in the SoC company is hard
Beyond much easier updates, I do not understand that we can anticipate much from Whitechapel. Great deals of Android makers made their own chips now, with differing levels of success. Samsung has the Exynos line. Huawei has its HiSilicon chips. Xiaomi made the Surge S1 SoC back in 2017, just recently introduced the Surge C1 video camera chip in the Xiaomi Mi Mix Fold, and it has a financial investment in a silicon designer. Oppo is working on developing in-house chips, too. None of the existing efforts has actually had the ability to substantially beat Qualcomm, and the majority of these companies (aside from Huawei) still pick Qualcomm over their own chips for essential devices. Everyone, even Qualcomm, is depending on the very same business, ARM, for its CPU styles, so theres not much room for difference between them. When everyone is using off-the-shelf ARM CPU develops the major locations of differentiation left are the GPU and modem, two locations Qualcomm stands out at, so it gets picked up for many significant devices.
Google has made a few chip style hires, but those are split between the separate hardware and server groups, and they fade in comparison to purchasing an entire business. When even Qualcomm isnt currently shipping custom chips, I dont see any way Google uses anything over the off-the-shelf ARM CPU styles.
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